Upper Lip Plumping Procedure Uses Botox and Dermal Fillers

Sculpting the appearance of the upper lip is delicate business – and sometimes two procedures are better than one. A recent episode of ABC’s The Doctors showcases a new, two-part procedure that can enhance the appearance of the upper lip without the need for surgery. This technique uses a Botox injection to mask fine lines, followed by hyaluronic acid injections to add volume.

You can see the procedure and the results in the video below, but a word to the squeamish: the video shows a woman having her lips injected with dermal fillers. Although the procedure is painless, you may not want to watch it if you have a fear of needles.

“I’ve always had thin lips,” says Mary, the patient in the segment. “I’ve tried different kinds of lipsticks and liners and things that might allegedly plump your lips but it’s not really worked. I don’t do enough for myself and it would be really fun to have some girly lips.”

One half of Mary’s twofold procedure has been performed in advance. Since Botox takes 24 to 48 hours to take effect, the wrinkle-erasing treatment is already been injected into Mary’s upper lip to resolve the fine lines that appeared there. The second step, which is performed onstage, involves adding volume with dermal fillers along the border of the lip. This is where the lip has thinned as a result of the aging process.

“Typically, with the aging process, you see those lips thin, because we lose volume in the structures around the mouth,” says Dr. Ordon. He also notes that – because Botox and hyaluronic acid fillers will last around 3 to 6 months – patients can have both halves of the procedure renewed at the same time. With the dermal fillers in place, Mary can see her results instantly, with lips that have been completely transformed.

Top 10 Bariatric Tips From the RealSelf Community

bariatric-surgery-tipsCommunity support is often crucial with any weight-loss journey. Thanks to the power of the Internet, people are increasingly finding support entirely outside their local networks, and meeting with like-minded people online. The cosmetic surgery website RealSelf.com is one such place, where users support each other through their struggles. A recent post on the site highlighted 10 tips from various community members who have undergone gastric bypasses, a form of bariatric surgery that often precedes body contouring surgery.

1. Follow your doctor’s advice. Quit smoking, follow a set exercise routine, take your medication regularly, and whatever else your doctor recommends. Your body will thank you.

2. Do an honest self-evaluation. Sometimes it helps to take a close look at your body, habits, and routines. What do you want, what do you need, and what can you leave behind?

3. Have the right attitude. My best advice is to be practical but optimistic – “keep your head in the clouds and your feet on the ground.”

4. Drink a lot of water. H2O is beyond important. Put away those sugary drinks and pick up some cold, refreshing water, especially when exercising.

5. Don’t rush back into eating. After gastric bypass surgery, patients need to abide with liquid and puréed foods for some time. It’s important to ease the transition back into regular eating habits.

6. Change your eating habits for good. “Say to yourself, this food does not taste as good as skinny feels,” says RealSelf user Cindy.

7. Learn coping mechanisms. “You have to see someone and really spend serious time talking about what to expect when you have slimmed down,” says Cynthia J. “You will still have your issues with self worth but you will learn to have your coping mechanisms.”

8. Join a support group. Many doctors offer support groups where patients can talk about their experiences. This is especially important for bariatric patients, who have a long and rocky road to full recovery.

9. Realize that surgery is only a tool. Proper diet and exercise are still essential. You can still be unhealthy, even after a gastric bypass, if you don’t take the right steps.

10. Determine if it’s “worth it.” This is a question that every prospective patient has to ask. After massive weight loss, patients often find that they are left with excess skin, and require body contouring procedures such as the breast lift, body lift, and tummy tuck. Where will your journey take you?

Stress and Medical Factors Involved in Female Hair Loss

It’s more than just hormones – there are a variety of factors responsible for hair loss in women, including genetics, health, and lifestyle factors, according to a recent study in the latest issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. Researchers found that high stress levels, smoking, hypertension, and cancer have all been associated with increased hair thinning.

Higher levels of testosterone have been associated with female pattern hair loss for many years. The hormone often causes hair loss of the sides and top of the head. Researchers have also known for a long time that genetics play an important role in hair loss. However, other risk factors for female hair loss have not been fully understood.

With this most recent study, researchers were able to eliminate the genetic variable by studying 98 identical twins. By comparing their lifestyle and medical factors, as well as measuring the twins’ testosterone levels, the researchers were able to measure the impact of non-genetic and non-hormonal factors.

Environmental and Medical Risk Factors for Hair Loss

  • higher levels of stress (often linked to separation or divorce, multiple marriages, and more children)
  • higher income levels
  • prolonged sleep (possibly related to depression/anxiety, as well as stress)
  • cancer
  • high blood pressure
  • diabetes
  • smoking
  • lack of exercise
  • not using sun protection

Interestingly, the researchers found that women with a higher caffeine intake were actually at a lower risk of hair loss. This may be because caffeine counteracts the hormonal effects that can lead to hair loss.

The researchers concluded that women can decrease their risk of hair loss by reducing some risk factors. While many genetic and medical factors can be very difficult to change, women can start to reduce their risk by working on lifestyle factors, like smoking and stress.

Dr. Joseph Murray, Transplant Pioneer and Nobel Laureate, Dies at 93

One of the shining stars of plastic surgery is gone. Dr. Joseph E. Murray, who performed the world’s first successful kidney transplant and received a Nobel Prize for his work, died late last month at the age of 93. Dr. Murray died on November 26 after suffering a stroke at his Boston home on Thanksgiving.

Like many plastic surgeons of his time, Murray had a military background, and performed reconstructive surgeries on troops who had been injured on the front. Burn patients were often treated with skin grafts from other people, and the fact that skin grafts tended to be more successful when donors and recipients were closely related was a matter of great interest to Dr. Murray. As he wrote his autobiography for the Nobel Prize ceremony, “The slow rejection of the foreign skin grafts fascinated me. How could the host distinguish another person’s skin from his own?”

After the war, Dr. Murray went to work at the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, which is now known as Brigham and Women’s Hospital. He and his colleagues developed a number of new surgical techniques through successful kidney transplant in dogs. In 1954, Dr. Murray and his team successfully transplanted kidney from 23-year-old Ronald Herrick to his twin brother Richard Herrick, who was suffering from end-stage kidney failure.

Dr. Murray continued to perform transplants on identical twins. As far as transplant operations go, identical twins present the least amount of risk – since the transplanted organs are genetically identical to the host body, there is no risk of foreign tissue rejection. Dr. Murray added to the growing body of knowledge on immunosuppression by performing kidney transplants on close relatives. With the development of immunosuppressive drugs, he was able to move beyond radiation therapy, and performed the first organ transfer from an unrelated donor in 1962.

Throughout the rest of his career, Dr. Murray continued to practice plastic surgery and the transplant surgeries that he had pioneered. In 1990, he shared the Nobel Prize in physiology or Medicine with E. Donnall Thomas, who had developed bone marrow transplantation as a treatment for leukemia.

Image credit: Harvard Medical School Archives