Category Archives: Skin Care and Health

New App Targets Appearance-Conscious Drinkers

A new smart phone application released by the Scottish government shows how alcohol abuse can change your appearance.

While the “Drinking Mirror” may not address the more severe long-term health concerns of alcohol abuse, it does reveal a consequence that heavy drinkers might overlook.

The app is very simple to use. You download it on your Android or iPhone device, upload a photo (or choose one from your gallery) and then position the face and eyes in a template. Choose the number of drinks you consume per week and then sit back and watch the transformation.

The results are startling. On a recent episode of TODAY, women at a Houston area tavern tested the Drinking Mirror app on camera. While they weren’t happy with their “after” photos, the group was skeptical of the app’s methodology, arguing that too many other variables, like genetics, fitness, and diet, were left out.

Nonetheless, the app could be valuable for spreading awareness about some of the subtle yet undesirable effects of drinking. “Binge drinking leads to problems with your body and your brain and self harming behaviors that can lead to addictive behavior,” said intervention specialist Brad Lamm on TODAY.

Although the Drinking Mirror app comes from Scotland, the problem is not unique to that locale. 1 in 8 American women are binge drinkers who consuming at least 6 drinks at a time, according to the CDC.

Original photo by Jennifer Lord Photography on Flickr.

Stress and Medical Factors Involved in Female Hair Loss

It’s more than just hormones – there are a variety of factors responsible for hair loss in women, including genetics, health, and lifestyle factors, according to a recent study in the latest issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. Researchers found that high stress levels, smoking, hypertension, and cancer have all been associated with increased hair thinning.

Higher levels of testosterone have been associated with female pattern hair loss for many years. The hormone often causes hair loss of the sides and top of the head. Researchers have also known for a long time that genetics play an important role in hair loss. However, other risk factors for female hair loss have not been fully understood.

With this most recent study, researchers were able to eliminate the genetic variable by studying 98 identical twins. By comparing their lifestyle and medical factors, as well as measuring the twins’ testosterone levels, the researchers were able to measure the impact of non-genetic and non-hormonal factors.

Environmental and Medical Risk Factors for Hair Loss

  • higher levels of stress (often linked to separation or divorce, multiple marriages, and more children)
  • higher income levels
  • prolonged sleep (possibly related to depression/anxiety, as well as stress)
  • cancer
  • high blood pressure
  • diabetes
  • smoking
  • lack of exercise
  • not using sun protection

Interestingly, the researchers found that women with a higher caffeine intake were actually at a lower risk of hair loss. This may be because caffeine counteracts the hormonal effects that can lead to hair loss.

The researchers concluded that women can decrease their risk of hair loss by reducing some risk factors. While many genetic and medical factors can be very difficult to change, women can start to reduce their risk by working on lifestyle factors, like smoking and stress.

8 Popular Alternatives to the Facelift

Many of my new patients are uncertain whether facelift surgery can really help them. In fact, facelift surgery can only treat 2 out of 4 major signs of facial aging – sagging skin and wrinkles. The other two major signs of aging – uneven skin texture and pigmentation, and loss of volume –are left virtually untouched after a facelift.

There are many different facial rejuvenation procedures. Some provide the lifting benefits of a facelift to a more localized part of the face. Others treat signs of aging that cannot be resolved through a facelift. This post will break down some of the different treatments that we offer at the Beautologie Cosmetic Surgery & Medical Aesthetics – so that you can think beyond the facelift.

Sagging skin. The brow lift and eyelid surgery can treat sagging skin and wrinkles on your forehead and around your eyes. Unlike the facelift, these surgeries are focused on one particular part of the face. For less severe cases of loose skin, the Aluma Skin Tightening System is an advanced laser treatment that can provide smoother, firmer skin.

Uneven skin texture and pigmentation. These common signs of aging are often caused by UV radiation over many years. For smoother skin and even tones, sometimes little more than a surface treatment is needed. Skin resurfacing and IPL photofacial are both ideal treatments for sun damage.

Lines and wrinkles. The brow lift, eyelid surgery, and Aluma technique are all well-suited to treating lines wrinkle. However, there are also countless nonsurgical treatments for treating facial wrinkles. These include the injectable products Botox and Restylane.

Adding volume and definition. As we age, we tend to lose volume in our face, which can make us appear gaunt or pinched. Facial fat grafting is one popular method of naturally restoring volume to the face. By adding your own natural body fat to your lips, cheeks, or other facial features, you can regain the appearance of vitality without the need for a facelift.

Some Bacteria are Good for your Skin, Says UK Daily Mail

Good skin care and antibacterial soap may not mix.Do you use antibacterial soap on your face? While washing your face is an important part of your skin care routine, you may want to reconsider the use of bacteria-killing soaps. According to a recent article in the UK Daily Mail, there are many types of good bacteria in our skin that are being eliminated by these soaps.

What are the benefits of these good bacteria?

– they help our immune system

– they fight wrinkles, sagging, and pigmentation by preserving your skin’s natural beauty

– they maintain moisture and fight bad bacteria that cause redness, sensitivity, and other skin infections that can leave lasting scars

– they help to build collagen within your skin

As a result, many skincare companies have begun to research and offer products that promote beneficial bacteria.

What does this mean for you?

First of all, it means that if you are using an antibacterial soap for your face, it might be time to take it out of the washroom and put it next to the kitchen sink – so that you can sanitize your hands before and after handling food.

It also means that skincare can be more complicated than you might think. There is no such thing as one product or technique that works for everybody. That’s why it’s important to speak with skin professionals who can determine the best routine for your skin. At Beautologie, we offer a variety of skincare products, which we are happy to provide after a consultation – to find the products and routines that are best for your individual skin.

We are also pleased to help treat existing signs of aging with a variety of rejuvenating therapies. This ranges from minimally invasive techniques – such as laser skin resurfacing and Botox – to surgeries such as fat injection and facelift.

Wrinkles Make It Harder for Younger People to Read Emotions

We all know that lines and wrinkles on the face can make us appear angry, tired, or cranky… even when we’re in a good mood. But can wrinkles make it difficult for others to tell when we are happy or sad? A new study in the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology has revealed that wrinkles can interfere with how younger people perceive the emotions of older people. On the other hand, older folks are better able to decipher the emotions behind wrinkles.

The study involved 65 young college students who were asked to view computer-generated faces of three men and three women. Some of the faces were young (19–21), while others were old (76–83). The faces were programmed to display neutral, happy, sad, and angry expressions. The participants were then asked to rate the expressions on the faces on a 1–7 scale.

The researchers found that the students were most accurate in recognizing angry expressions. However, they were rather inaccurate in judging sadness in the older faces. As well, happy older faces were perceived as showing less overall emotion than the younger faces.

The wrinkles on older faces can create confusing signals, so that facial expressions are perceived differently and less clearly. That’s why so many people choose to have procedures like brow lift, facelift, and skin resurfacing. These treatments remove the illusion of tiredness or grumpiness so that your real self can shine through.

According to the study’s lead author Dr. Ursula Hess, “the anger [in older faces] is seen as mixed with other emotions. Clearly it makes a difference whether you think someone is just angry or someone is both angry and sad.”

Interestingly, Hess says that the results would have been different if the participants had been older. As we age, we get more experience in recognizing the emotions in older faces. Other non-verbal cues, like posture, tone, and body language, are also useful to those who have learned to read them.