Inside the Latest Facelift Procedures

Not all facelifts are created equal. In fact, there are a variety of different facelift procedures, with new techniques being developed all the time.

The most recent innovations in the field of facelift surgery involve delving deeper into the tissues of the face to provide results that traditional techniques can’t match.

These new techniques shouldn’t be confused with the “non-surgical facelifts” or “liquid facelifts” advertised by many cosmetic surgeons. These phrases don’t actually described facelift surgery, but instead refer to procedures that use syringes instead of scalpels. This includes dermal fillers such as Restylane, as well as other treatments, such as Botox.

In fact, “facelift” refers to a surgical procedure, during which excess skin is removed and underlying tissues may be tightened. While nonsurgical procedures can often provide amazing results, nothing can rival the ability of facelift surgery to correct sagging skin and deep folds. These are among the most pervasive signs of aging, and cannot be remedied simply by adding volume or inhibiting certain facial muscles.

The SMAS Layer: Why It’s Important

Traditional facelift procedures don’t touch a certain layer of the face known as the superficial musculoaponeurotic system (SMAS). This is a thin layer of muscles and fibrous tissue that surrounds and connects the muscles that are responsible for facial expressions.

Newer facelift procedures delve deeper into the structures of the face in order to correct sagging at its roots. Since sagging is caused by facial tissues being pulled down by gravity, newer facelifts modify these deeper layers in order to provide longer-lasting results. Cosmetic surgeons realize that, in many instances, performing a superficial facelift won’t help patients who have significant sagging in their deeper facial layers.

To cutting-edge facelift procedures that delve to this layer of the face are the SMAS lift and deep plane lift. The main difference between the two is that the deep plane lift goes one step further than the SMAS lift. While the SMAS lift tightens the SMAS layer, the deep plane left releases attachments beneath the SMAS, repositioning and over the deeper layers of the face.

While these newer facelift techniques often require more down time, many patients find that the results outweigh the disadvantages. The SMAS lift and deep plane lift often offer dramatic results that last significantly longer than the traditional facelift technique.